2020

Talk Cinema's Ron Falzone Discusses Bull Durham, directed by Ron Shelton

The Coronavirus has impacted everything.  For many Americans, the loss of two pastimes is particularly irksome:  Sports and sex.  And it’s even more acute at the moment because it is spring, the season for both baseball and nookie.

We frequently turn to the movies to provide us with those things we feel are missing in our lives.  If so, could there possibly be a better time to watch Bull Durham.

Fireball: Visitors from Darker Worlds by Werner Herzog

Werner Herzog’s FireballVisitors from Darker Worlds  tracks the common meteor from outer space to strikes around the world, continuing the collaboration between the indestructible German-born Herzog, now 78, one of the greatest rogue filmmaking adventurers of all time and Cambridge University Volcanologist Clive Oppenheimer,

Talk Cinema's Ron Falzone Discusses Anatomy of a Murder, directed by Otto Preminger

Dramatically if not legally, Austrian-born producer-director Otto Preminger was always fascinated with criminal proceedings.  Beginning with his tutelage in Vienna under the legendary stage impresario Max Reinhardt, Preminger was drawn to plays that ended with courtroom theatrics.  When he shifted to film directing in America he frequently sought out opportunities to stage scenes overseen by judge and jury. 

Talk Cinema's Ron Falzone Discusses Otto Preminger's' Advise and Consent

There seems little doubt that the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is going to drive yet another reckoning in a year filled with them.  Forces on both sides lined up within an hour of her passing to stake their territory and begin what will undoubtedly be a very ugly couple of months.  It seems the ironic state of our current approach to democracy requires that politics, once entrenched, has no room for compromise.  You

Talk Cinema's Ron Falzone Discusses Avanti!, directed by Billy Wilder

Billy Wilder created several classic films leading up to his twin masterpieces, Some Like It Hot and The Apartment. Most studies of his work stop there, referring to his post-1960 output as his slide down from the mountaintop.  Admittedly, few if any movies could stand comparison to those two, or, for that matter, to his earlier Double Indemnity, Sunset Boulevard and Ace in the Hole.  But

Talk Cinema's Ron Falzone Discusses Point Blank, directed by John Boorman

Film noir was the synthesis of a number of movements: an Americanizing of German expressionism and French poetic realism with a little Warner gangster film thrown in for good measure.  More a mood than a genre, these movies hit their full flowering in the postwar years because the gloom on display perfectly suited the existential angst and accompanying social breakdown that inevitably follows global conflict.  As the nation

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